Mark your calendar! The 2015 Symposium will be in Singapore, July 22-25. Read more here.

April 24, 2014

Spring has been slow in coming to Brooklyn this year and it feels good to slip into the habits of the season.

It's been such a long, dark, dismal winter -- like being on some other planet entirely. It's great to see the season begin to change. The transition seems very gradual this year.
The Sharkway.  El seguimiento del progreso de la primavera.  Brooklyn. (The Sharkway.  Following the progress of spring. Brooklyn.)
La vuelta, desde español, mi esposo reflejado, Brooklyn. (F train again: coming back from Spanish class.  My husband reflected in the subway window, reading of course.)

La vida se convierte en un desenfoque en el tren F: guemando plata con Piglio (Life becomes a blur on the F train, reading Ricardo Piglia.)
Sharon Frost, Day Books

7 comments :

Mark Leibowitz said...

So true. It seems to be taking of ever for the cold to leave here in NY. I'm always curious how you create your drawings. Would love to look over your shoulder and watch you start with a blank page

patmosphere said...

Beautiful soft style and sense of pattern. Thanks!

Sharon Frost said...

Thanks for the support! I layer and layer and layer. I think my approach comes from years of painting (mostly in oil). Once in a while I lay down a line and that's that -- but rarely.

Al said...

Why do you insult your husband in Spanish and then don't do it in the English translation?.

Sharon Frost said...

Al, it doesn't have the same feeling in English. In Argentina it's used in many ways, often affectionately -- I gave him a "Boludo" tee-shirt a few years ago -- it wasn't meant as an insult. The English translation conveys something different. Direct translation doesn't always work.

Al said...

Sharon, I am originally from Argentina and I can tell you that the word "boludo" is an insult and it's never used affectionately.
The fact that you found t-shirts with the word boludo on them doesn't mean that it's not an insult. Those t-shirts are sold to foreign tourists as a souvenir of Argentina as a language curiosity since that's an Argentinian word not used in other parts of the world.

Sharon Frost said...

Obviously I'm not Argentine, but I do spend lots of time there. And I do hear that word used lightly. But I'll remove it since it seems to upset you.